If Opinions are Like A**holes, is Advice Actually Helpful to Artists?

I’ve been pushing this painting around as if I’m rearranging a room.  No huge, OMG changes but slowly the composition has been coming together and while I know it’s not done yet, I’ve been having fun with this one instead of feeling the dread “why isn’t this coming together?” feeling.  I’ve been thoughtful with my brush strokes while still letting my heart guide me.  It’s a balance that feels so good when it’s present.  Too much heart and the composition tends to get lost and the pallet is all over the place.  Too much thought and the painting is tight and has a feeling of being bound.  So, I’m feeling pretty good…

…Then I send the in-progress picture to my Mentor.  She likes it but says to be careful about being too tidy and that I need to be looser with my brush strokes.  I feel frustration coming over because it had felt so good when I was doing it and now I’m questioning that I actually know when I attain that important balance of heart and head and maybe I can’t really recognize it and if I can’t recognize it then maybe I’m not doing it right and if I’m not doing it right then maybe blah blah blah… and now my brain is off to the races.  I only need one little bit of doubt to creep in and everything else, all the hard work and that wonderful feeling of balance is, in my mind, shot to shit.  Not to mention I’ve already forgotten that she said she liked it.

abstract, art, expressionism, painting, contemporary, wip, work in progress, artist, mixed media
Too Tidy...?

I have a tendency to lean towards insecurity so by default I take things way too personally and generally assign too much importance to what other people think.  This, of course, has absolutely nothing to do with my Mentor.  She is a wonderful artist and a lovely friend who gives terrific advice.  She has a wealth of knowledge and experience.  She has guided me to the place where I am now.  She is invaluable and I don’t know what I would do without her.  That being said, I think that as an artist, I need to be able to draw a line between the soul of the art, and other people’s advice.

Artist, skeptisismWilamena and I are skeptical of opinions

When someone gives me advice, I tend to take it.  Especially when it comes from people that I love and/or respect.  Why wouldn’t I take it?  They know more than me.  They are further along in their careers than I am.  I should take the advice…right?  I’m thinking the answer is, not always.  And that’s the tricky part.  How do I know when I should take the advice and when I should continue on as I have been? 

 safety first, mask, sanding, good adviceMy carpenter Husband says that I should use a mask while sanding...that sounds like good advice from a reliable source.

I’m an emotional person who tends to think in extremes.  I go from smiling and being amenable to everyone’s advice to feeling resentful and vowing never to take anyone’s recommendations ever again.  (Blog on being a tortured artist forthcoming.)  I make the best decisions when I can remove my insecurity from the situation and ask the simple question “Is that right for me and my art?”  For instance, I’m looking at my piece 24 hours of cool down later and now that the comments are not so raw, yes, I can indeed see that there are areas that are too tight and tidy.  That doesn’t mean that the entire piece is bad, for Pete’s sake!  Breathe Girl!



Cross Town Traffic 24x24 Mixed Media on Canvas...and she was right...it was way too tight and tidy.

I suppose that what I need to learn is to do is to say “Thank you” and then give my emotions time to chill before making the decision to fully heed the opinions of others...or not.  There is a practicality about advice when it comes from a trusted, experienced source but there is also a point at which I know what’s best within my own process. So, I need to practice getting my Om on in order to find my own voice within this sea of people that know more than me.  And let’s face it, sometimes a painting needs a little crazy to balance out the practical. That may just be the contrast that this painting needed.

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Artist Profile: Nicholas Wilton - Building Communities of Creatives One Workshop at a Time

Being a career west coast abstract artist would not be possible without the help of talented teachers.

When I first started this journey of becoming a professional artist, I was running solely on emotion and old, ignored art supplies.  I didn’t have a goal.  I didn’t know that this would be my career.  I was merely trying to express feelings of remorse, anger and agitation that were alarmingly amplified when I decided to quit drinking.  No longer comforted by simply burying these discomforts under the weight of alcohol, I unearthed them and then needed a tool for dealing with the difficulties that bubbled up.  

I had leftover paint, paper and some brushes and so I started.  I had never done abstract painting before, but sobriety was just about all my brain could handle.  Thinking about realistic details of a still life, or…let’s be honest here…trying to do anything with any specificity at all was really difficult.  I just began to move my brush-holding hand and abstracts are what sprung from my fingertips.  And it saved me.  

Finding art again was an unexpected gift given to me by my willingness to let go of old coping mechanisms and being open to getting to know myself.  Self-awareness had never been my strong suit.  So, discovering that I am an artist was amazing and at the same time, a “well duh” moment.  I knew it all along, I just ignored it because I didn’t think it was practical road to travel.

Guidance from an established west coast abstract artist and teacher was the inspiration I didn't know I needed.

Nicholas Wilton West Coast Abstract Mixed Media Artist
Nicholas Wilton is a Sausalito, CA based abstract artist and teacher whose workshop I attended flipped me into action.  I have been painting consistently since.

 

A year into my self-administered art therapy adventure, a good friend suggested that I take an Art 2 Life workshop taught by Sausalito, CA based abstract artist, Nicholas Wilton.  After briefly checking out his website, I was immediately attracted to Nick’s art.  His use of shape, repeated pattern, movement and vibrant colors widened my eyes and motivated me to learn more.  I signed up and drove to California for 5 days of art making.  It was the best thing that I have ever done for my art, my confidence and my career. 

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life Workshop Westerbeke RanchDay #1 of Nicholas Wilton's Art 2 Life Workshop at Westerbeke Ranch in Sonoma. 

Nick taught his 6 art principles which included color, harmony, value and design.  Many of these had been introduced to me in my long abandoned fine arts schooling but not thought of since, and they were important reminders, but his 6th principle was the most important and influencing….Soul.  Heeding soul was not taught in art world academia and wasn’t that what I was really working on?  Cleansing, listening, being receptive and responding to my soul?  Without knowing it, Nick was reiterating what I had been learning over the past year…to thine own self be true. 

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life WorkshopDay #4: My works in progress at Nick's Art 2 Life Workshop.  The finished version of the one in the right corner is at the top of this blog post.

Nick also believes in the importance of having a community to lean on as well as contribute to.  Over the past couple of years, he has continued to be a huge support and inspiration to me through his art, blogs, video lessons and willingness to make time for students like me.  He recently made himself available for a 15-minute interview so that I may share some of his wisdom with you. 

If you are an artist needing direction, I highly recommend his workshops and if you can’t afford those, just sign up for his blog "The Artlife".  He often sends out videos discussing his work, process and problem solving.  Read on for our conversation about his influences, challenges and maneuvering through the business of art. 

A 15 minute interview with west coast abstract artist, Nicholas Wilton.

MG: You seem to be a master of creating patterns without making the painting have a “wallpaper” feel.  Is that something that you have to work for or does it come naturally? 

NW: People always say to make exciting design, you have to have a variety of sizes and shapes and things, and you can, for sure…but you can also [work within] a pattern.  If the pattern is repeating, that can be somewhat monotonous because when we look at one part of the picture, the same kind of feeling occurs in another part of the picture, so that’s the recipe for sort of boring somebody.

Nicholas Wilton Color-Field-1 Abstract Painting Mixed Media ArtNicholas Wilton, Color Field One, 36x40, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

But if you can offer differences within that context, that can become really interesting.  So, for example, maybe the pattern repeats, but the color is different on different parts of the pattern. Then that becomes noticeable and interesting.  Or maybe the texture is different.  (Pointing to the painting above.) That painting looks like little chips of color [in rows].  That’s not a very particularly exciting pattern because the pattern isn’t really anything…just a bunch of colors…but I’m talking about colors and the conversation about color.  All of the sizes are the same and they are in a line but I’m really paying attention and offering the viewer something that’s different.  There are contrasts that happen to be in the [different] colors.  Patterns can be wallpaper like but when you change things within that, then it becomes exciting.

MG: The first artist you studied with was a stained-glass artist Ludwig Schaffrath.  How did working with glass influence how you paint now?  What was the biggest lesson that you learned from him as a new artist that you carry with you today?

NW: Well I entered into it more as a craft.  I liked making things, so I was learning how to make stained glass.  The thing about stained glass is that [you start with] incredible pieces of glass.  Some are translucent.  Some are transparent. There’s glass from Germany that’s really beautiful. What you learn pretty quickly is that maybe it’s the materials that are so amazing. 

Let’s say you pull out this amazing piece of glass that you love. It’s so beautiful just on its own. Then you cut it up and you make a flower out of it... So, I became interested in the questions of why do I keep taking this amazing material and turning it into pictures that happens to be made out of stained glass, but really weren’t very good?  When you think about a picture of a stained-glass flower, it’s kind of bric-a-brac. It can be kind of cheesy.  So, I started to look around at different artists that were doing work as good as the materials.  

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life Workshop Work TableAn Art 2 Life Workshop table.  The raw materials are just as important as the finished product

 

Ludwig Schaffrath was making these incredible modern day monastery windows…very contemporary and very much in alignment with the glass. I was seduced by the materials because of the caliber of the finished product.  The materials were so good that it upped my game to get better at designing and using it. What I learned from this gentleman when I was 15, is that the only thing you can really do is something personal and unique.  If you want to copy reality, that’s fine but you have to do it in a way that’s personal. He was the first one to press that idea that I still teach today and try to do in my own work.

MG: I recall you saying in a workshop that you can try to make your art look like another artists’ but it’s never going to.  It’s always going to look like you. 

NW: Yeah.  We can try on different ways of working.  I can copy an artist for a day and try to make my art look like theirs but you won’t stay there very long because it’s not very interesting because they’ve already done it.  But it is important for you to pull out and discover the reason why you were attracted to their work.  You might love Mark Rothko but you don’t want to be Mark Rothko.  You just want to understand the way he’s using color because that’s what you love.  I wouldn’t want to do a Mark Rothko painting because he already did them all.  People learn that eventually and they move on. 

Nicholas Wilton Bone-Yard Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Bone Yard, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery (I LOVE this one.)

MG: What is the most challenging part of being an artist at a professional level?

NW: I think there are three parts: 1. Isolation 2. Not having all of the information to do this…it takes time to have all of the information, how to paint, what to do when you get stuck, all of that technical stuff and then 3. Having the right place to do it.   I couldn’t make these paintings in a small room anymore.  I had to move to a bigger space and it was scary.  I had to pay more, I wasn’t sure I could do it… Having a practice that works…that’s something you have to learn.  They don’t teach that.  Having a good community and a solid art practice or approach and just the basic information.  That is what I teach in my online courses and workshops.  If you can give that to people, that does it…. especially the community part.

Nicholas Wilton Millwork Abstract Painting Mixed Media ArtNicholas Wilton, Millwork, 60x60, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG:  So creating a community of artists that you see regularly and having people that you talk with often…

NW:  Yeah and even connected on a Facebook group or whatever.  I’m really interested in creating community…that’s why I’m talking to you right now. We are staying connected.  We might not have talked for a long time but we’re connected and I just believe that’s a path that allows me or anybody to do this rather unusual activity and pull it off successfully. 

MG: You teach workshops as well as painting.  Do you enjoy one more than the other? Do you feel that teaching and painting complement each other?  How? 

NW: They work in conjunction.  I don’t think I could teach if I wasn’t doing the practice.  I have my own personal practice and then I’m helping people develop theirs.  I do these Sunday blog posts and those are done completely spontaneously.  I’m painting and then I learn something new or I’m getting new perspective and I just share that with people. Certainly, the teaching is derived from the painting. And teaching clarifies my own practice.  The best I ever paint is after 7 days of teaching a workshop.  I go home and I can pretty much guarantee that I’m painting more confidently and probably a little bit differently than I was before I left.  So, it’s a win/win as far as I’m concerned.  It works for me.

Also, you can’t forget that by teaching I’m getting inspired by all of these other people.  When I see your painting and what you’re doing…you’re painting larger now…I get that juice from you.  There’s been an exchange because we’ve worked together a little and I see what you’re doing and it’s bigger and it’s “wow!” and that fires me up and my day is just a little bit better and I use that energy to go do this challenge (pointing around the studio). 

Nicholas Wilton Pin-Point Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Pin Point, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG: You had a gift line business adventure at one time.  How did you feel when that opportunity came along and why did you ultimately decide that it wasn’t for you? 

NW: I created the opportunity in a way because I was tired of doing illustrations…you get paid for one and then do another one and another one and another one… I would make some really good art but it would just disappear so I thought “how can I make some of this art stay around?” and the idea of putting it on products, gifts specifically, like trays, boxes and tote bags, came along and I worked with some friends and we created a company. 

What happened though was that the momentum, the need, the desire to sell, that directed the company, of course…that’s the whole point…to make money.  But my direction was partly that, but to also make the best possible work I could.  And at one point, one of our biggest sellers were basically little tiny cheap reproductions of paintings that you could get at Walmart or Bed Bath and Beyond for like $5. I saw my own personal work [reproduced] but I was uncomfortable because I’m also a fine artist and I had done a lot of work to keep my work at a premium, to keep the prices high, to make it prestigious, because it is. It’s what I do.  It’s really important.  But I saw that this was cannibalizing that and I didn’t like that.  It didn’t feel good to me.  And when something doesn’t feel good to me, regardless of the money, I know from art, from my life, you don’t do continue doing that.  You do something else. There are alternatives.

Nicholas Wilton Blue-Storm Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Blue Storm, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG: Spring is almost here.  Seeing as nature is such a big influence for you, do you notice that your paintings and pallet choices change when the seasons change? 

NW: Yeah.  I think so. My studio isn’t heated and I’m warmer now, which is half the problem.  I get so damn cold in here because these ceilings are so high so I’m bundled up in the Winter and it’s just a hard road for a few months.  Also, I think Spring is more of an opening and unfolding and Winter is a closing more.  There is an ease to it and a looseness and more color.  I think there tends to be, over the course of an artist’s career, to go from control to more and more loose and more and more exploration and an opening or broadening and I think that relates to seasons as well.

MG: What piece of advice would you give a young artist starting out and does that advice change if someone is starting out as a young artist vs. an older artist? 

NW: I just think it’s important to realize that each person, old, young, whatever, whoever, if they’re interested in doing this and if they can pay attention to what they love, and really focus on that and look within themselves, that’s really the path to making personal, authentic, sellable, desirable work that you love.  That’s the path and that’s available and they have everything they need they just may need some guidance.  Everybody’s unique and everybody can therefore make unique and personal work.  They just have to pay attention to themselves.

Learn more about Nicholas Wilton on his website.

The painting at top by me is "Original Bubble" 12x12 Acrylic, Paper and Graphite on Birch Board and was one of the pieces I created while attending Nicholas Wilton's Art 2 Life Workshop in 2014.  

Want to Make a Living as an Artist? Better Learn to Hustle!

As I dive into a professional career as a West Coast abstract artist, I am caught in the balancing act of finding time to make art and also figuring out how to get my art noticed.  

I have been in my office today thinking about my job in advertising sales.  I sucked at it.  I had to cold call all sorts of different businesses, from architect firms to gift shops, by phone and in person, in attempt to sell ad space for a New Orleans city magazine.  I didn’t like it at all.  My boss would say things like “We don’t take no for an answer!”  In my mind, I’d be thinking “but they said no…wtf am I supposed to do about it?”  I’m not a pushy person and talking about circulation and demographics just sounded like a hustle.  I didn’t like the hustle.  Now that I’m following my passion, all that has changed. 

Self-promotion is a MUST if I want to get my abstract art noticed.

I had been working on my art biz for almost 4 years when I finally decided to become a full-time artist.  I have enough business background and had done enough research to know that self-promotion was going to be necessary and I was NOT excited about it.  My past experience in sales showed me that I didn’t enjoy it and in turn, I wasn’t very good at it.  

I have never been a person who enjoyed the spot light.  Alcohol used to help with that but when I gave that up, I felt as though I was an introvert who had been pretending, my whole life, to be an extrovert.  The last thing I wanted to do is stand in front of you and tell you how awesome I am.  I realize now that the issue was that I didn't think I was worth much, and how can you self-promote if you have no confidence in what you’re selling?

Finding creative ways to market myself as a West Coast abstract artist is half of my day.  The other half, I actually make art.

As I’ve been diving deeper into what it means to be a professional artist, I find that “hustling” is about half of my day.  I have to figure out different ways to promote my art. I don’t mind talking with people about my art.  I don’t mind sending emails and making phone calls, starting dialogs on Instagram and whipping out business cards without being asked.  In my prior sales experience, my cheeks would burn red and I would get embarrassed talking about the magazine.  It all felt so phony.  But now I believe in what I’m selling and I’m finding out that’s half the battle.

I know there are people in sales who are true artists of their trade.  They can sell anything to anyone at any time.  Hats off to them.  For the rest of us, the most important ingredient to getting noticed is to, first and foremost, believe in your product.  If you’re selling yourself, you’d better like yourself ok or you’re going to have a really hard time.

When I joined Instagram, I stumbled across an artist from Miami named Ronald Sanchez who recently had a show called Word Play.  I am attracted to his use of reclaimed objects and stencil work.  I love his strong typography use and mixed media projects, but what I am really attracted to is his message.

 

My Hustle Has A Hustle Ronald Sanchez Art Miami Florida

After I saw Ronald’s above piece, it became my mantra.  I’m not kidding when I say that every person I see, I’m wondering if they could be a potential collector or influencer.  If I meet you for the first time I’m sizing you up and I can’t wait to tell you I’m an artist.  When I see that spark of interest flash in your eye you can bet that what I’m thinking is, “how can I engage you further?”  My hustle really does have a hustle.  And when I’m feeling so confident about myself that I feel I can do no wrong, I look to another one of Ronald’s pieces that speaks out to me:

 

Humble Hustle Ronald Sanchez Art Miami Florida

 

I can’t forget that staying humble is sometimes as endearing as oozing confidence and the two working together, well it seems a balance that I’ll strive for the rest of my career.  So, thanks to Ronald, for giving me my work mantra.  Because even on days like today, when my hustle feels pretty small, I just have to remember that that the squeaky wheel gets the grease and that I’m not going to reach anyone without making a little noise.  

And with that, look out because I’m off to hustle you, your Grandma and anyone else that might buy my art.  (Note the link?  That's right...I'm hustling you right now!)

The piece at top is Submerged 36x36 Paper & Acrylic on Canvas and it is for sale in my gallery.  Buy it before someone else does...

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Inspiration: Glorious and Moody Mother Ocean

The abundance of ocean art and surf paintings is proof of just how much inspiration the ocean gives. 

I've just returned from Baja and although the surf Gods were not really stirring things up in my favor this trip, I left Mexico reminded, once again, of the power of Mother Ocean.  Visually, there is nothing in comparison with looking out over the vastness of the ocean.  There seems to be no end, and in comparison to the self centered, ego driven, social media heavy life that people in our culture gravitate toward, the ocean puts us humans in our place and makes us remember how small we really are.

Mother Ocean astounds me.  Graceful, beautiful, and I am yet a twig in comparison to her power. 

Mentally, the ocean seems to change my brain waves.  My gerbil wheel of a thought process slows down when I'm ocean side allowing me to ponder more deeply and not be so reactive.  Physically, the ocean lets me know that I am nothing in relation to even her "small surf", as seen by the mighty mouse of a wave that grabbed me under water, flipped me around 4 times, and injured my back on the last day we were there.  (An hour later I was standing in a taco shack and salt water came pouring out my nose.) At times she beats me down, but in doing so I get stronger and stronger.

But I love her so.  Even if she kicks my ass every now and then.  She keeps me in check.  She helps me remember what's important.  She reminds me to be present in my life. And she encourages me to keep challenging myself even when I feel I've been beaten.  

While my art is not as "surfcentric" as some, it is certainly influenced by the ebbing and flowing of the tides and the ever changing, yet somehow repetitive surface of the water.  

Below are images of some of my very favorite ocean and surf inspired art.  

These artists see Mother Ocean through the eyes of water dwellers.  If they're anything like me, a piece of them feels like it's missing the longer they're away from the sea.  Sand in my toes and water up my nose.  Yeah.  That's my happy place.  

Wolfgang Bloch: Wolfgang's painting are moody, mysterious and alluring; reminiscent of the the beauty and danger of the ocean.  Calming to look at yet uncomfortable in their darkness and distance, these paintings are the simultaneous trepidation and elation I experience sitting on my surf board on the edge of the ocean.  So joyous to be on the water yet unsure about the world under my dangling feet and the white thunder that will inevitably come rushing towards shore.  

surf ocean art oil painting Wolfgang Bloch
Untitled NO. 175, Mixed Media, Wolfgang Bloch
surf ocean art oil painting Wolfgang Bloch
Untitled NO. 7, Oil on Vintage Painting & Wood, Wolfgang Bloch
Surf ocean oil painting Wolfgang Bloch
NO. 1025, Oil on Wood Panel, Wolfgang Bloch
surf ocean art painting Wolfgang Bloch
Untitled NO. 3, Oil on Vintage Wood, Wolfgang Bloch


Ross McDowell:  I get the sense that Ross has a true water soul.  He must be an astrological water sign.  His paintings give me the experience of being part of the ocean.  When I look at Hammer Time and Honu below, I can sense the muffled amplification that I experience when submerged under water.  I can feel the wind currents that the Pelicans are riding and the sense of anticipation when their wings are gliding just inches away from the surface of the ocean.  When I look at Ross' art, I can feel my body begin to sway and relax as if I am part of the tide.   His work also has a sense of history and a wisdom engrained throughout that may be attributed to his use of reclaimed wood. 
Pelican painting Ross McDowell
Pelican, Reclaimed Indonesian Teak, Ross McDowell
Hammerhead Sharks Painting Ross MacDowell
Hammer Time, On Reclaimed Indonesian Teak, Ross McDowell
Turtle Painting Ross McDowell
Honu, On Reclaimed Indonesian Teak, Ross McDowell


Heather Ritts: Heather's splashy ocean water colors manage to show the graceful adrenaline of waves and how they might feel underneath as on top.  By combining dynamic abstract painting techniques along with realism, Heather gives me the experience of both peacefully riding the wave and wiping out, all in one look. 
surf ocean art water color painting Heather Ritts
Complexity, Water Color By Heather Ritts
surf ocean art water color painting Heather Ritts
Purity, Water Color By Heather Ritts


David Macomber: David had a near drowning experience when he was 31 years old and has since dedicated his life to ocean art, and helping others change their perspective on life.  When I look at his art, I see grace under the water and calm in the sky, yet I feel I'm looking at the moment when that serenity shifts.  I'm almost waiting for the whale in Wind and Waves to come breaching out of the dark blue of Fourth Watch and with it, bursts of colors.  He writes "wind and waves grew calm" but I see energy waiting to explode.  It's true to the volatile nature of the ocean and coastal areas.  Calm one moment, and a storm the next.  I feel that in David's work.
ocean surf art painting David Macomber
Fourth Watch, David Macomber
ocean surf art whale painting David Macomber
Wind and Waves, David Macomber


Joe Vickers: I want to live in Vicklandia.  I want a brightly colored VW bus that runs on salt water and surf wax to pull up and take me away to lands where sleepy seagulls loiter on the beach and perfectly shaped barrels rush towards shore with the intensity of a Nerf wave.  Where everyone can nose ride and Bill Wither's Lovely Day plays on a loop.  Joe's work just plain makes me smile and we can all use a little more of that these day, don't you think?
Surf ocean art painting Joe Vickers
North County, Joe Vickers
Surf ocean art painting Joe Vickers
The Original Birdy Beach, Joe Vickers
Surf ocean painting Joe Vickers
Panhandle Summer, Joe Vickers
 

The drawing at top was done by me about 4 years ago. Just pencil on paper.

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How to Survive being an Artist? Be the Tortoise. Be the Duck.

Abstract Expressionist Painting comes from a deep, raw and vulnerable place in the soul.  Survival means being able to detach and be patient. 

Long before I was an artist, I worked in restaurants.  First in Boston and then in my home-town of New Orleans.  If you’ve ever worked in the service industry, there are some truths that you are familiar with.

  1. Service industry people are the hardest of workers who are brilliant with timing and efficiency while dealing with hyper-stimulated environments. They work long double shifts even if burning themselves in the kitchen or taking abuse from drunk customers and hungover managers/co-workers. And the good ones do all this with a smile and a kind of grace in team work that is mesmerizing to watch.  On a good night, it’s like being a part of a symphony.

 

  1. Cooks are artists. The people in the kitchen are practicing their art and it is the most delicious form of mixed media abstract expressionism.  They compose using a plate as a canvas so people can first eat with their eyes.  Then they combine taste contrasts and complements that make mouths water.  The culinary arts are practiced and mastered by some of the most creative people in the world.  They are crazy creative.  And speaking of crazy…

 

  1. …did I say crazy? Yes, there is a lot of that in restaurant kitchens…and front of house…but there is something about that kitchen.  A cast of characters they are, and I must admit I love those crazy fuckers who choose cooking as a trade.  Truth be told, I’ve always had a thing for a guy in a sexy white chef’s coat.  In fact, I had a baby with one of them.  But that’s not the point. 

Ross Mcdowell Sea Turtle PaintingWave God Honu, by one of my favorite ocean inspired artists, Ross Mcdowell.  

Being a West Coast Artist is about as opposite as being a restaurant server in New Orleans as you can get.  

The point is that now I am a painter alone in my studio, and while historically I have liked working in fast pace, high energy environments where I would ride the curve of a dinner rush, I now have to BE THE TORTOISE.  Let me explain.  I like, no LOVE, the efficiency found in restaurant work. If you’ve worked in the service industry you know the bottom line is “turn and burn”.  The way to make your money is to turn your tables.  Get them in and get them out!  The way to do that is through that well-oiled efficiency machine.

Now that I’m an artist by trade, I realize that in a lot of ways, it is the exact opposite of restaurant work.  My next steps are not as clear as knowing I will need a steak knife for table 9 because she ordered the filet mignon.  There is no “dinner rush” to get through.  I have to be slow and thoughtful and have patience with the art.  If I get impatient, the mixed media piece I’m working on just gets…well…mixed and sloppy looking.  I also have to be the tortoise while making contacts, building my mailing list, educating myself about marketing and SEO, building websites and social media followings and literally waiting for paint to dry.  It isn’t easy for me.  Plus, as discussed in previous posts, I’m an emotional person which brings me to my second directional:  BE THE DUCK.  

Mallard Ducks Long Exposure PhotographDribble (Mallard Ducks Feeding in the Ohio River), Falls of the Ohio, Indiana, 2015 © Scott Gilbertson

As an abstract expressionist painter, I have to tap into my emotions which doesn’t always feel so great.  I’ve got to let it roll off.

When I worked at a well-known steak house Boston, the chef was a large French man whose name I can only remember as “Chef”.  He liked to yell in French and having come from New Orleans, I was one of the few that understood what he was ranting about.  He seemed unhappy a lot and directed that at the wait staff, usually during the busiest hours of the night.  The only way to make it through?  Let it roll off my back like water from a duck.  My first waiting job I fled in tears during the first shift.  5 years later, I just yelled Oui Chef!!!, Non Chef!!!!, or Pardonnez moi Chef!!!! all the while focusing on getting my shit done.  It’s the same now except the one yelling expletives at myself is usually me or else it is someone giving well-intentioned advice.  It takes a lot of courage for me to put my artwork out there in the world.  It takes even more to not react to everyone’s opinions.  I just have to say to myself “Come on girl.  Be the duck and let it roll on off!”   

I love what I do.  I love being an abstract expressionistic artist.  Even though it’s challenging for me, I love working alone in my home and yes, I even love watching the paint dry (albeit with a hair dryer sometimes when I’m antsy).  So…quack quack and *whatever noise a tortoise makes.  I’m in this thing for the long haul and slow and steady really does wins the race, even when it’s raining opinions that are often hard to take. So, now that I’m moving too slow to create dust, eat my lack of dust!  I’m just cruisin’ here!  

The painting at top really tried my patience this month.  It is still a work in progress.  Join my mailing list get a sneak peek at the finished painting.  

Creativity and Carnival: The Art of Mardi Gras Costumes.

Making Mardi Gras costumes is a creative outlet for many New Orleanians. 

Mardi Gras has come and gone in my beloved New Orleans and one more year has passed that I have missed this epic celebration in the Crescent City.  The above photo of me was taken at Preservation Music Hall in the French Quarter on Mardi Gras day, 2009.  It was an amazing day filled with eye candy that I continue to look back on for inspiration.  This year, I was tortured with pictures of friends and family dancing in the streets wearing amazing Mardi Gras apparel.  It was a reminder of a period of time when I wasn't painting, sculpting or drawing, but creating costumes during carnival season kept my creativity alive.

New Orleans Mardi Gras costumes are an unique art form.

Most New Orleanians grow up costuming and most don't think of themselves artists.  It's just what they do.  They are given no direction. Mardi Gras doesn't have a theme, unless you count debauchery.  If you're wondering what to wear for Mardi Gras, inspiration can come in many forms.  There is a group of people called the Skeleton Krewe that all dress as skeletons.  This year, some of my friends took on a beautiful floral theme.  Some use Mardi Gras to communicate a political or social point of view.  Whatever the chosen genre is, you can bet that New Orleanians go beyond the typical beads and face paint seen worn by tourists coming off of Bourbon Street.

Locals are versed in the art form of Mardi Gras outfits and I am always inspired by their creativity.  Keep in mind that Mardi Gras officially starts on Twelfth Night in early January and doesn't stop until Shrove Tuesday AKA Mardi Gras.  It is a multi-week celebration and that mean LOTS of costume opportunities.  So, without further adieu, I give you photos of my very creative friends from this year.  They are amazing and I miss them so!  Enjoy!

Mardi Gras Wear at its Finest

Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans
Bethany and Michael said "If anyone is looking for artificial flowers, don't go to the Michaels in Elmwood, we bought them all".

Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans Marie Antoinette
Of her Marie Antoinette costume Veronica says, "Oh ho hi ho ( insert French accent) I am redy to be zeen by meh pezant people... you vill eat zi cake and you vill like it..."


Mardi Gras Costume Stilt Walker New Orleans
Scarlett is very bacchanalian with her box of wine on a staff.  I suppose that's the easiest way to have a drink when you're on stilts.  Photo credit Ryan Hodgson-Rigsby.

Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans
Tiana (AKA MC Sweet Tea) and Sarah always rock it on Mardi Gras.  Sarah says "My first run as a pony girl was magical".  I mean that carrot...come on.


Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans Tin Man
Leah doing the Tin Woman. I assume Dorothy and the rest of her Krewe are not far behind.  Photo Credit Linka A Odom.


Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans
Laurie and Reya Sunshine in full bloom and looking gorgeous as always.  All on a Mardi Gras day.

Mardi Gras Costume New Orleans Cemetary
Buddah's neon suit is bright enough to wake the dead.  Photo credit Mark Balsam Photography.

 

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How Fear Makes Me a Better Abstract Artist

Fear Makes Me a Better Artist, Mountain Biker, Surfer, Skier, Mom, Wife...

Half way through my bike ride I stopped, ripped off my helmet, threw it to the ground and immediately burst into tears.  I had been mountain biking regularly for about 3 years and I couldn’t understand why I was still so scared.  I kept waiting for it to let up; for the fear to subside so I could bike with confidence; so I wouldn’t tremble whenever I went around a blind turn or when there was a sheer drop-off just a few feet away.  It never got better.  The moment I got on the bike, I was scared.  That was all there was to it.  As I picked up my helmet and inspected it for cracks, I asked “why on earth am I doing this to myself?”

This is the same fear I encounter every day in my work as an abstract artist.  Fear is alive and well and looms in my studio like a dark cloud.  It follows me to the computer when I’m trying to figure out marketing and social media.  It gets blustery when I sit down to write blog posts (because I’m a visual artist, not a writer!).  It starts to drizzle when I think about the future and if my choice to make art my living is a prudent thing to do. 

After that bike ride, I made a decision to stop riding.  I would no longer try so hard to do things that scared me like that.  That evening, I ran into my buddy, Nick.  (No, not on my bike…at a concert.)  Nick is also a mountain biker.  I vented that I was tired of the fear, tired of feeling timid, and that I just didn’t understand why it wasn’t getting better.  Then Nick told me something that changed my life:  IT NEVER GOES AWAY.  He said that after years and years of riding, he still gets scared and get this…he likes it.  It’s part of why he rides.  ?????????WTF?????????  Nick encouraged me not to quit and to embrace the fear.  It was a tactic I had never thought of. 

mountain biking Applegate Lake Applegate Valley OregonMountain biking on Applegate Lake.  It took me a long  time to get used to the sheer drop-off to my right.  Photo by Chris Goodyear.

Fear and Art is Another Version of Fear and Life

When I call myself an artist, I feel scared.  When I start a new painting, I’m scared.  When I decided to quit my job, and pursue art, I was so terrified that I got acid reflux and had to quit drinking coffee (true story).  But here’s the deal: some of the things that bring me the greatest pleasures in life are things that I’m scared of.  Mountain biking, surfing, skiing, being a good mother and wife, abstract painting…  I have the same reaction to them all.  I’m scared of failing so I work harder at it.

Abstract Art Inspiration Comes with Accepting the Reality of Fear

What Nick said to me changed everything.  I got back on the bike, this time, with a reframe of fear in my mind.  “Ok Fear!  You’re here!  I’m here!  Neither of us are going anywhere so let’s try to work together, yeah?”  I started peddling and a strange thing happened.  When I knew that fear was a natural reaction, it didn’t scare me as much.  It didn’t go away, but I wasn’t paralyzed by it and it didn’t influence my motor skills.  Riding became smoother and I became a better biker.

I have written before that I used to live my life driven by fear.  It’s true.  But what I have been able to do through outdoor sports like mountain biking is to re-define my relationship with fear.  There are times when fear means “STOP NOW” and there are times when I can brush it off my shoulder. 

mountain biking dread and terror trail north umpqua oregon
Smiling on the Dread and Terror portion of the North Umpqua trail.
Photo by Chris Goodyear

The Freedom of Art: Doing My Art Anyway Even If I Am Scared

Think of it in terms of a different emotion, happiness.  When I found out that I was going to be published in an art journal, I was so happy that I bounced up and down and hugged everyone around me and shrieked in excitement.  But does that mean that every time I feel happy that I need to do an ecstatic freak out dance of happiness?  I would go so far as to say that would not be normal behavior.

I have no idea what I’ve gotten myself into.  I don’t know if I will succeed as an abstract artist but maybe all I need to do is live with that insecurity knowing that it very well may never go away.  I do know one thing, staying still is no way to move forward. There a sure-fire way of falling over on a bike in a creek crossing and that is to stop peddling.  I think I’ll put one peddle in front of the other and keep moving.  Through moments of doubt when painting, through insecurities that tell me I’m not good enough.  I’m not going to stop and stare at that because then I’ll just be stopped and one thing is for sure…I do not enjoy and have never enjoyed being still.  I got things to do and people to see and paintings to paint and hustles to hustle.  Onward!

Artwork at top is Divide and Conjure 12x12 on Birch Board

"My Hustle has a Hustle." - Artist Ronald Sanchez

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