Tag: abstract painting

How I Know it’s Time to Stop Asking for Advice

As a West Coast abstract artist, I am, by default, also a small business owner.  Even when my gut is telling me the answers, I find that I yearn for outside approval before making decisions regarding my business.  It's time to stop.

I am a well-supported individual.  I always have been.  I have the love and support from a team of people who want nothing else than to see me succeed.  I have always felt this support, especially from my parents, my entire life.  They supported me when I wanted to go to art school, switched majors to business, became a yoga teacher, a stock broker, when we decided to move 2500 miles away…  I am a well-loved person.  I am so grateful.

But now that I'm 8 months in since I quitting my day job to focus on my art, I am asking myself the question “Am I listening to too many voices?”.  Feeling so supported is a wonderful thing, but I wonder, does it change the way I listen to myself?  The past couple of weeks I have felt a bit stuck.  Like, in every way.  It has been difficult to make decisions and therefore, my forward momentum has been like moving through molasses. 

Now, I am fully aware that my idea of “productive” is probably way beyond a normal level of productivity.  My Mom and I were joking the other day that the reason that I didn’t cry when I was born, but instead lifted myself up with my arms to get a good look around, was because I was trying to figure out where to start multitasking.  I have always been a “doer”. 

For the past twenty years or so, I have had jobs where my checklist was clear and straight forward and I spent my days with a great sense of satisfaction as I moved from one task to the next, checking the items off my list.  Five years ago, I brought my art practice and business development into my routine and every day I checked off items.  Make art, check.  Build a website, check.  Set up Instagram and Facebook business, check.  Incorporate mailing list and send eblasts, check.  Write blog, check.  Attend business webinars, check.  Setting everything up was not hard for me.  It was just another to do list.

Marigny Goodyear Art Visual Meditation Paintings Work In ProgressI made a decision to make smaller pieces in order to create a lower price point rather than reproductions because it felt right for me, despite advise from loved ones saying otherwise.

But then I quit my day job to work on my art business full time.  Suddenly, the check list items became more ambiguous.  Like, Revise Bio and Artist Statement…ok, with what changes?  Grow social media following…sounds good…how?  Start working on different series of art work…uh…won’t I confuse what I’ve already done?

Then there is my support team.  They are awesome and each bring something different to the table in the ways of life and career experiences.  But what happens when I try to talk things through with the people who are closest to me and they don’t say what I hope to hear?  Or suggestions are made that are simply not in line with the business model that I’ve been investing in.  Do I go and change everything around based on their advice? 

I’d like to focus on a fragment from the above paragraph: “…and they don’t say what I hope to hear”.  Basically, by admitting that I’m hoping for certain advice to come out of their mouths, I am acknowledging that I already know what I think the answer is and I am just simply passing it by another to reinforce what I have already decided.  When the opinion is different, it just confuses and frustrates me.  

I think I’m at a point in this process where I know what is best for my art and business.  The problem is that I have always had such an amazing and enthusiastic cheer squad, that I have become habitually reliant on passing things by my support team.  It’s almost like it’s not real until I talk to one of them about it, whatever the “it” might be. 

Marigny Goodyear Abstract Art Visual Meditation Paintings Work in ProgressEven at this point in my process, just finishing the under paintings, this choice felt right for me

It is because I’m scared.  I’m scared of making the wrong choices.  Of spending my time and focus on the wrong items.  Of failing.  Of letting them all down. 

Maybe, in a way, I feel the need to pass every little detail by them because it takes some of the burden away.  If they give me advice, and it turns out to be the wrong choice, then part of the responsibility is taken off of me and put on them.  Just typing that makes me feel like a coward. 

Recently, I’ve been feeling as though maybe I need to keep things a little bit closer.  Maybe I need to proceed with actions based on the instincts within me.  For example, I’ve been trying to come up with ideas for “entry level art” and the idea of reproductions keeps coming up from one of my support team.  The problem is that I have wanted to build a business making only originals.  The idea of creating cheaper reproductions is not attractive to me.  I can’t finish the paintings the way I want.  I can’t wrap the paint around the sides of the canvas.  I can’t hand sign the back.  It’s just not the ideal model for me.

I’m not throwing the idea completely under the bus, but I know that I need to try to build my ideal business and right now, I’m not sure I want to invest the time and energy it would take to get high quality photos taken of the pieces for reproduction.  To research all the different print on demand companies.  To test each one by ordering the reproductions…and on and on…

I would rather invest that time in creating small originals.  And so that is what I’ve been doing all week.  Now, I will say that I did have an hour-long conversation with my Mom (the Head of my Cheer Squad) about this that enabled me to make this final decision.  She asked good questions and at the end of it, I had clarity.   So, I’m not saying that should become an island.

Marigny Goodyear Art Abstract Mixed Media Visual Meditation PaintingsI am so glad that I put energy into this project.  Not only do I have a new series of work in the form of visual meditation paintings, but I also have a great price point for the holidays and for "introductory level" art.   

What I do think is that when it comes to my art and business, that my instincts are usually correct and that I need to learn to trust them more.  Because of that, I think it may be time to talk less and act more.  I need to trust my artistic voice and my business gut.  

It’s difficult because in the past, I haven’t always made the best decisions.  But in looking back, most of those decisions were based on what I thought other people would want me to do.  As Polonius says “To thine own self be true.”  How can I be true to myself when I am constantly reaching outward for approval?  It’s a bad habit.

Going forward, I am going to only ask about things that I have actual confusion about.  Not things that I know the answer to and I’m just hoping that someone else will agree with me so I’m sure it’s right. I already knew the solution.  What I risk is confusing what is already clear, and that is just a waste of valuable time. 

 Marigny Goodyear Abstract Mixed Media Art Seagulls Work in ProgressIf I wouldn't have made the decision to do this, I wouldn't have my Seagulls painting.  (Detail of Seagulls can be seen at top of this blog post.)

I am my own CEO, CFO, Creative Director, Marketing Manager, PR Executive and Board of Directors.  I also have an Advisory Council.  Not every decision must be passed by them.  They are there for support and guidance, when needed. 

It’s intimidating being my own boss.  If I fail, I don’t have anyone to blame but myself.  But failure is just an outcome of being ballsy enough to try, so what’s the big deal?  Faith in my own abilities is a muscle that I need to exercise.  I have a feeling it’s one of those things that will get easier and easier the more I do it.  So today, I begin.

The detail at top is Seagulls 36x36 Acryllic and Paper on Canvas.  

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How I Know It's Time to Blow Up My Routine

As a self employed West Coast Abstract Artist who works from home, routine is oh so important to keep me moving forward.  But how do I know if the routine needs adjusting?  

On September 1st, I wrote a blog on how important my routine is to me and how I was excited to get back to it after a Summer of distractions.  Now, I’m going to take all of that back.  It is time to BLOW UP MY ROUTINE.

I have always been a goal oriented rule follower.  I created my routine and as a rule, I’m going to stick with it until my goal is met.  But what happens if my goals aren’t attained.  Then what do I do?  Well…after having a panic attack (and a carton of ice cream), I think it may be time to re-assess. 

 Marigny Goodyear Art Sea Gulls in ProgressHere is my Sea Gulls Painting in progress.  This is the point in my process when it's time to "blow it up".

Last month I read you off my routine schedule and how it keeps me on track.  That’s true.  But what happens when I realize that the routine I’ve been adhering to isn’t creating the returns that I had hoped? I’ve been working the same routine for 6 months.  Now in the long term, that’s nothing but in the faster paced world of social media, that’s quite a chunk of time. 

I’ve had a rough couple of weeks.  I blamed it all on my routine being screwed up.  But here’s the deal…after trying to get back to the routine, I realize that it’s not working.  My eblasts aren’t getting engagement, the links aren’t getting clicked on and the social media isn’t growing as quickly as I’d like it to. 

So, what’s the fix here?  Time to try something new.  

I’ve been focusing on multiple platforms and I’m going to reduce it to one.  Not that I won’t maintain the others, but I’m going to narrow my focus for a moment and see what it yields.  I won’t get into the technical specifics as it’s more boring than watching paint dry.  The point is that I have to start looking at marketing like I look at my painting process.

Marigny Goodyear Art Work in ProgressWoah...a scary step, indeed.  But a necessary one in order to move forward.

When I’m painting, and something isn’t going the way I want it to, I change it.  I take a “when in doubt, do” attitude and I experiment away.  Now, with marketing, it’s a bit different as I have to have a period of time to examine and so changes can’t be quite so reckless.  However, I think 6 months of a steady marketing routine is time enough to decide if this is working, or not.

The answer when applied to my current marketing strategies is “or not”.  My social media growth is slow, my email list growth is non-existent and the website visitors are not beating my online door down. After careful analysis, lots of research and the implementation of some marketing help, I start anew.  Let’s see what the next 6 months are going to bring.  

It’s time to shake things up and see where they land this time around.  *deep breath…and here I go.

 

The painting at top is Paper Airplanes 22"x28" Acrylic & Paper on Canvas.  A gift for my daughter on her 16th birthday.

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How Art Helps Me Manage Unrealistic Expectations

Through the practice of Abstract Expressionism, my inner control freak has loosened her grip on my life and my loved ones.

Thank you to TinyBuddha.com for publishing my article titled How Expectations Can Drive People Away and How to Let Go of Control.

I once was my own worst enemy when it came to being fixated on outcomes.  Being so focused on what I thought "should" happen all the time led to constant disappointment and a feeling of isolation.  Through the practice of my art I have found that stress truly is optional.  

Once again, I am completely humbled by the response to my writing. I have received emails, DMs and comments from people who know and struggle with the constant disappointment of expectations never being met.   Please take a read, and if it resonates with you, feel free to share.  

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Summer is Over - Time to Get Back to Routine

Being a self-employed West Coast abstract artist is a dream come true but staying on task and moving forward means being consistent and disciplined with my routine.

School is back in session.  Amen.  Hallelujah Brothers and Sisters.  For those of you who have children, you definitely know the struggle of keeping a routine during the Summertime.  If you have children and work from home, you REALLY know this struggle.  And if you happen to be a parent, who works from home and is easily distracted by outdoor adventure and activities…well…you get it…

I think all-in-all I’ve been pretty good about keeping forward momentum this Summer.  At the same time, I’ve also been trying to get in a decent amount of ocean time, relaxation and fun.  Now that Summer is in its twilight and school has started, I’m really excited to get back to my work routine.

Marigny Goodyear Art Summertime PlayingIt's hard to work when there is fun to be had and meadows of flowers to run through...  Photo by Jayden Becker.

Routine: noun - A regular course of procedure without which I aimlessly walk in circles pretending to be productive...and then go surfing.

 

Last blog post I talked about one of the most asked questions I get as an West Coast abstract artist: “Where do your ideas come from?”  Today, I’d like to talk about the second most asked question I get: “How do you stay on track working from home?”  This is, apparently, a common struggle for anyone who doesn’t have to punch anyone else’s clock but their own.  Unfortunately for the question askers, I cannot totally relate to this struggle because as long as I have a good routine in place, it isn’t hard for me at all to stay on task.

However, after being asked this question for the 80th time, I have been giving it more thought, and I realize that I do have a few things consistently in play that help keep me accountable to my routine.  Here are a few of the strategies I utilize to keep me on track.

  1. Social Media is my Boss. I post to social media every day.  Almost without fail.  In order to be able to post new content every day, I have to make new content.  Meaning, I have to be actively creating abstract art in the studio.  If I haven’t gotten in the studio and made a healthy amount of progress throughout the week, I have nothing to share with my followers.  I do keep a back log of images that can be used in a pinch in case of illness or a surf report that cannot be ignored, but for the most part, I try to stay productive. 

 

  1. Calendar it out! I keep an electronic calendar that I put my weekly tasks on. Monday is blog writing day. Tuesdays, I collect website/social media analytics to make sure I’m going in the right direction.  Wednesday and Thursdays, I reach out to media and influencers and check out education webinars.  Friday I schedule social media for the week.  Blog posts go live on the first and the fifteenth, work in progress/studio sneak peaks are eblasted the second week of the month and new available work for sale email is sent the third week.  And yes, I’m aware I missed most of these for August…dern ocean kept calling me back for more!  It’s Summer for Pete’s sake…we’ve all got to give ourselves a break every now and again…

 

  1. Progress in the studio yields more progress in the studio. Huh?  Well what I mean is that the more art I create, the more I want to create, the easier it is to get started and move from task to task.  The comments and likes I get on social media motivate me to share the next steps.  The more I’m working, the more ideas I get, the more techniques I discover and the more excited I am about working.

Marigny Goodyear Art Catching the SunI mean come on!  Summer goofing is hard to pass up!  
Photo by Jayden Becker

Having a routine leads to progress.  Progress equals growth.  Growth makes me excited and excitement creates a desire to work more. 

That being said, I’m SO very glad that school is back in session because the degenerate surfer in me was starting to more and more choose the surf over the work.  And while I am in full support of engaging in the activities that keep me inspired (as surfing does), I’m also aware that mid-August thoughts of renting the house out and living in the surf van are not the healthiest for my work ethic.  

So, it’s time to pull back the reigns, turn up the hustle and get back to a proper pace.  Here’s to the new school year, more progress, growth and excitement. Let’s rock and roll.  I'll try not to get too terribly distracted by the pretty flowers.

Marigny Goodyear Art Flower GirlPhoto by the lovely and amazing Jayden Becker

Photo at top is Shrimp 36x36 Acrylic & Paper on Canvas.  #2 in my Louisiana inspired series.

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In Search of New Art Ideas: 3 Ways I Collect Inspiration

As an abstract artist, the most common question I receive is "Where do you get your ideas?" Having giving this much thought, I realize that the answer is all around, and inside me.

I am preparing for my third show of the Summer and boy, my soul is tired.  I was so excited at the response that I received when looking for places to exhibit my work.  It wasn’t expected and so when three different places offered me shows for June, July and August, I knew that I was in for a busy Summer.

I have been working consistently and was able to have completely new paintings for each show.  Making the art isn’t hard for me.  I don’t really have to wait for inspiration to come.  I have a schedule that I’m on the computer the first half of the day doing marketing and admin, and I’m in the studio the second half making abstract art and for the most part, I’ve stuck to it with ease.  

The most common question that I’ve gotten is “where do you get your ideas?” and it’s a bit of a tough one to answer.  My first instinct is to respond that the ideas happen in the moment as I practice abstract expressionism, which by definition, is spontaneous.  But after answering the question for the 15th time, I’m realizing that I may be becoming less spontaneous and more thoughtful as time goes on.

Sometimes the most simple shape can have the most meaningful impact in my abstract paintings.

Paper_Airplane Cut Out Abstract ArtOne of many paper airplane cut outs for my kiddo's birthday gift.

My daughter is turning 16 this month (holy crap) and she asked for a new painting for her room, which we are going to paint and make over for her birthday.  When I was beginning her painting, I thought about objects and images that she likes, and a sharp yet light paper airplane shape stuck out to me.  And so, I began Nora’s painting with paper cut outs of 16 dark paper airplanes and 16 light ones (she is amazingly balanced for an almost 16-year-old). 

The painting came out fantastic. (I'll share it with you all after her birthday.) It was the first time that I used an actual “thing” for my paper cut out instead just a repeating shape like a circle, diamond or hexagon.  It was whimsical and fun without being immature and it managed to retain sophistication.  And upon completion, my brain was immediately flooded with images from my own childhood growing up in New Orleans and the swamps of Louisiana.

Inspiration may come from many different places but images from my childhood in Louisiana are allowing me to create more meaningful pieces. 

Pelican In Flight Paper Cut Out for Abstract PaintingOne of many different pelicans cut for the first of my Louisiana series. (See finished painting at top.)

I settled on pelicans for a second experiment and began a painting using the same process that I used for Nora’s paper airplanes.  I'm so pleased with how it turned out.  I have sketches now for a Louisiana series that has images of shrimp, hurricanes, fishing hooks, fleur de lis, snowballs…  There are a lot of ideas and this is how I plan on spending my Autumn.  I’m can’t wait to dive in. 

This series is more personal and I’m finding that it is reminding me of some of my old artistic inspirations that I got from children’s book illustrations.  I can’t wait to see how the series turns out.  In sketching these images, I began to realize that even in the paintings that seemingly come out of nowhere, just as these Louisiana images came to mind and I was able to observe and collect them into my sketch book, I have been collecting ideas for my abstracts in similar ways all along.

Marigny Goodyear Abstract Art Shrimp Paper Cut Out"Shrimp Again?!" A common dinner time complaint from me as a "spoiled by fresh gulf seafood" kid. #2 in my Louisiana series.

Want new creative ideas for your abstract art?  Just look around.  Observation is an important tool.

So, when I’m interested in finding inspiration, here is my tip to myself:  Be Observant.  I mean this in a few different ways:

  1. Observe what gives me a “charge”. I took Nora to see Taylor Swift in 2015 and at one point during the show, her dancers had huge paper airplanes on sticks and they were flying them over the crowd.  Visually, it was right up my alley.  It was playful, whimsical, surreal and a little magical.  I felt a fire of amazement begin to burn in my chest at the visual impact that these simple paper airplanes had on the audience.  Nora felt it too…we still talk about how amazing it was thus, the paper airplane painting.

 

  1. Observe recurring images in my head. Ever since I was a kid, I loved to watch the pelicans sore over the bayou.  When I learned to surf as an adult, I was so excited to see them surf the air currents over the waves.  I didn’t know they could do that as we didn’t have waves like that in the bayous.  After beginning my pelican painting, I realized that I have a ton of these simple images in my head.  They are all special to me and I believe that connection can be seen in the painting.  It is more personal.

 

  1. Observe all the time. One night I was out to dinner and the server brought over our silverware rolled up in napkins.  The napkin rolls were secured with strips of paper about an inch or so thick and were covered in an intriguing prism like purple and blue pattern.  I took everyone’s little piece of paper from their napkin rolls home and included them in a painting.  I also have taken candy wrappers and foils, wrapping paper, cocktail napkins in pretty prints…  Art supplies are everywhere. I’m in the habit of being on constant look out for them.

Prism Napkin Ring Scrap Paper Unbelievably cool paper used as napkins rings at a local restaurant. 

It took about 2 years for this habit to develop.  But now, I have to carry a little sketch book with me at all times as when I see inspiration in my head (or on my dinner table) I know that I have to catch it quick or it may be forgotten.  Last night I thought of another great New Orleans image and this morning it’s gone.  I was lazy and didn’t make a note of it and there it goes.  Out into the ethers.  I hope I remember it later. 

So, if you’re wondering where I begin, the answer is that I simply look around both externally and internally for those little nuggets.  Who knew a simple paper airplane or a silhouette of a pelican in flight could be inspiration for a painting? A better question is why wouldn't it be?  Thankfully there are an infinite amount of ideas flying around and all I have to is pluck them and put it in my pocket, or in my sketchbook.  It’s just that simple. 

How and/or where do you find inspiration?  Please tell me in the comments below.  Thanks for your input!  Please share this post if it resonates with you.

Photo at top is the first from my Louisiana series.  Pelicans 36X36 Paper, Acrylic and Graphite on Canvas.  
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What's the Most Important Tool in My Art Studio?

As a professional West Coast abstract artist, I have many tools in my studio.  But the most important tool I have is a willingness to experiment.

Put me in the middle of an art supply store and for an instant, I am a six-year-old in a world of wonder.  I see possibility in just about every product offered and my fingers will literally start to buzz.  It’s a visceral feeling. 

I feel incredible inspiration just walking through the aisles and what I’m thinking is: “just hold onto this feeling until I’m back in the studio”.  This doesn’t just happen in the art store, but also browsing interesting products online such as stencil cutters, gold leaf kits and different shapes of paper punches.  I could easily spend hundreds and hundreds of dollars on all of these products and in fact, I have. (See unopened stencil cutter on bottom shelf).  

However, time and time again, when I think about the most important and most regularly used tool in my arsenal, it’s not something physical.  Rather, it’s the flexibility of my creative mind AKA a willingness to experiment.  Without this tool, my art would be pretty monotonous and boring.

Marigny Goodyear Abstract Mixed Media Painting Work In ProgressI started this series the same way I always do.  By painting the canvas and then papering with different shaped cut paper.

Not becoming attached to my abstract art is the first step to experimentation. 

Early on in my abstract art experiment, my mentor told me not to allow anything to become too precious.  This was something that I was quite familiar with as a lot of my pencil drawings and illustrations were so detailed, that I wouldn’t even allow my hand to rest on the page for fear that the graphite would smear.  I was so high strung and bound up about a lot of my life when I got back into art, and I didn’t want that feeling to override the rest, so I began drawing with my left hand.

By doing this, and without even knowing it, I had learned the lesson about not keeping my art too precious.  I was yearning for freedom in many places in my life where the need for control had become overwhelming.  In art, I found a safe place to practice this freedom without there being any consequences.  Nothing mattered.  I could literally piss on my art and no one was going to tell me that it was wrong.  (Although it’s not the most original idea as Andy Warhol did that back in the 70’s.) 

Marigny Goodyear West Coast Abstract Artist Painting Work in ProgressI wanted to try something new so I taped all 6 of the little canvases together and painted the next coat as if they were one painting.

A few weeks ago, I wrote about just doing anything when it comes to art; about changing it up when stuck.  The essence of this strategy is not being afraid to “ruin” anything.  I used to get so attached to my art.  Not so much anymore.  There have been pieces here and there that I have kept but for the most part, once I have a good photo, I’m happy to separate with it to a good home.  

Without experimentation, I would pretty much be making different iterations of the same piece over and over.  B-O-R-I-N-G!  I would rather experiment and find the next really cool technique, even if it means painting over what I just spent 3 days working on.  What’s the worst that can happen?  I end up painting over the entire thing and start from scratch.  Musician and song writer Allen Toussaint lost nearly his entire body of work and his beloved Steinway in Hurricane Katrina.  Do you know what his reaction was?  Something along the lines of: “That’s ok…I'll get another piano and I’ll just write more.”  YES!!!!  No fear.  No attachment.  Just continuing creativity. 

Marigny Goodyear West Coast Abstract Artist Paintings Work in ProgressThat day, my Mom gave me a little round tin that had all of these cute tiny cookie cutters in all different shapes.  Inspiration ensued.

The only abstract art rule I follow is that there are NO RULES.

I once overheard an artist at her exhibition talking to a patron about the workshops that she teaches.  She said, “I tell my students that they absolutely CAN’T use paint right out of the tube.  They HAVE TO mix it and make it their own.”  I’m gonna go ahead and call bullshit on any statement about art that has the words “can’t”, “have to” and “shouldn’t” and also any sort of art “rule”.  There is no such thing.   As a person that used to live a pretty high risk life, art is a safe haven for me in that THERE ARE NO RULES.  There are no “bad” color combinations.  There is no governing board of artist laws.  The coolest thing about being an artist is the absolute freedom to experiment.

Marigny Goodyear West Coast Abstract Artist Painting EstivalEstival #4, 8x10, Paper, Acrylic & Graphite on Canvas. Even that dark blue bubble like shape was due to experimenting with new "tools"... like the lid of the tin.

So, if you’re stuck on what your next move should be, or if you know the piece isn’t finished but you’re scared to ruin what’s already there, go and paint something bold over whatever it is your stuck on and that’s too precious to change!  Use the paint right out of the tube!  Put black next to blue and while you’re at it, wear a belt that doesn’t match your shoes and white after Labor Day!  Let your freak flag fly and express yourself any damn way you please.  And if anyone ever tells you that something about your art is “wrong”, first swallow the urge to tell them to go f*ck themselves.  Instead, simply smile and say that “wrong” is in the eye of the beholder.  

All you fearful artists out there, repeat after me: “THERE ARE NO RULES IN ART THEREFORE MY ART CAN NOT BE RUINED!”  

I'd love to hear about how you experiment.  Feel free to comment below!

 The painting at top is Estival #2, 8x10, Paper, Acrylic & Graphite on Canvas.
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Tiny Buddha Blog Post

I'm a West Coast Abstract Artist who struggles with anxiety and negative thinking.

Thankfully I'm not alone.  I wanted to thank Tiny Buddha for including my article,  "My Proactive 8-Part Plan For Beating Anxiety and Negativity".   

The response to this has been overwhelming.  Thank you all for commenting, sending messages, emails, etc.  I am truly humbled.

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Artist Benefits from Job Hopping

The path to becoming a professional West Coast abstract artist was there all along.  I just didn’t see it until it all came full circle and I had a change of perspective on the day job.

I have been an artist by trade for approximately 4 months.  Prior to that I had worked as an Executive Assistant for a husband and wife team who ran both for profit and non-profit companies.  I was their right-hand woman for over 8 years and it was hard to say goodbye, but I was finally ready to take the leap to follow my passion.   They’ve gotten unexpectedly slammed busy, so I’ve been doing a little work for them this week and as I was working on their schedules this morning, I started thinking about all of the different jobs that I’ve had.

High Tech Ergonomic Office Equipment
My studio office. Only the best high tech ergonomic office equipment for this artist.

At one point, I described my resume as looking like it belonged to a crazy person.  I’ve been a Yoga teacher, a stock broker, an advertising sales exec, a restaurant worker (front of house and cooking), an education programs coordinator…I could go on and on.  But now that I’m having to jump back into a supportive admin roll (albeit temporarily) it’s really got me thinking about how all of those different jobs support me on my path to becoming a career artist. 

So, I thought I’d reflect on the many careers of Marigny Goodyear and explain what each one has taught me and how that’s applicable to my life as an artist.  For all those artists out there who are still dragging themselves out of bed each day to get to the day job: it is serving you beyond a pay check.

Feeling like I was seen as a quitter because I was a serial career changer was tough on my confidence, but actually each job was a learning experience that lead back to one thing…life and work as an abstract artist. 

The Hospitality Industry – “How may I be of service?”

I worked in fine dining restaurants, caterers, event planners and 5 star hotels cooking, serving, and managing and I loved it.  It was hard working and hard playing life style.  In those fast pace environments, I learned A LOT.  So much in fact, that I feel the need to use bullets:

  • How to anticipate the needs of others and give them what they need before they ask
  • Attention to detail and how to be efficient in my movements.
  • How to work on my own and also in a team.
  • The importance of forward thinking. What do I need to do today to better serve me tomorrow?
  • How to multi-task (for better or for worse) and to be prepared and organized (you’d better know where everything is at all times when you’re moving 100 miles per hour).
  • And the most important take-away: The value of good customer service. That includes doing what I say I’m going to do in a timely manner, following up even when I think it’s not necessary, taking the words “I assume” out of my vocabulary and showing gratitude…even when you’d rather give the customer a good eye poke.  

 

Having a baby was what ultimately made me leave the restaurant industry.  The hours were hard and I realized that once my daughter started school, I would never see her, so when a friend of a friend offered me sales job at a magazine, I jumped at the opportunity to become a… 

…Advertising Executive – “We don’t take no for an answer!”

Oy…my least favorite job.  I always took no for an answer.  When my boss would call me on it, I’d say “but they said no….what I’m I supposed to do?”  Great sales person, right?  I assumed that I just sucked at sales but really what was going on is that I didn’t feel genuine in the importance of what I was trying to sell.  I learned about dealing with clients and the necessity of follow up, follow through, organization and meeting deadlines. But what I ultimately learned from this experience is that unless I am passionate about what I am selling, sales are a waste of time for me. 

To be honest, the whole thing just stressed me out and so I decided to take a hobby and make it my job and I quit to become…

…A Yoga Instructor – “Let’s get our Om on, Y’all!”

I loved Yoga.  I did it all of the time and so when my teacher suggested that I become a teacher, I jumped at the opportunity.  I went to a month-long teacher training course in the Bahamas (because WHY NOT?) and started teaching immediately when I got home.  Private clients trickled in and I was gaining a little following at a few Yoga studios but really what I was gaining was a massive amount of debt. 

Yoga along the Mississippi New OrleansNora and I practicing Yoga along the Mississippi River

In the few years that I taught Yoga I learned how business can grow if you stick with it although I didn’t have the time or money saved to stick with it very long.  I also learned the importance of breathing.  This is where my meditation practice began and hear me when I say that I would be a crazy person without my daily meditation practice. 

I still do Yoga sometimes but not like I used to as I also learned that sometimes taking something I love and making it a job can beat the love for it right out of me.  I ended up taking another part-time job with a very successful money manager, organizing receipts in order to figure out how much money his wife had spent on their new house renovation.  That led me to become a…

…Junior Stock Broker - “$$$$$$$$$$$”

I learned how to talk to a different type of clientele…one with money.  I also learned how to make a mean spreadsheet, a tool that I use frequently and may one day make an art project out of.  I learned about stocks, bonds, money markets, mutual funds, basic analysis and became a licensed stock and bond broker.  Ok…so I admit that a lot of that stuff oozed right on out my ears when I quit, but basic finance will always be with me and I will never forget learning the importance of nurturing your clients….again…back to good customer service.  Sending birthday cards, holiday gifts, email updates, whatever it takes to make them feel special and attended to.  It’s mandatory. 

Artists use spreadsheets tooArtists use spreadsheets too...at least this one does.  I would be lost without my spreadsheets.

I was on my way to getting an additional license to sell insurance and I actually would have stayed longer in the finance industry but two life changing things happened within 6 months of each other:  I fell in love and hurricane Katrina (aka The Storm) hit New Orleans.  My job moved from New Orleans to Birmingham, Alabama.  I stayed for 9 months but when my now husband proposed to me, I chose love over the career and moved back to Post Katrina New Orleans where I had trouble finding work.  A good friend of mine’s father took pity and hired me to…

…Organize financials to be used in divorce litigation

I worked at his CPA firm for about a year and I learned that I NEVER wanted to get a divorce…But being as far away from the arts as this job brought me and wanting to support New Orleans artists who were struggling after The Storm led me to open my own business and, in a way, back to the arts.

B-native.com…”Buy New Orleans Art Y’all!”

Marigny Goodyear Abstract Art

My logo for (now closed)b-native.  An online art market for New Orleans artists.

My first business venture.  B-native was a web site where NOLA artists could have a platform to sell their art online since New Orleans tourism was suddenly non-existent. It was a juried online art market that I kept alive for 5 years.  It was quite the experience and labor of love.  Here I learned to be careful about going into business with friends and if you do, get it in writing.  Not having a formal partnership agreement from the get go was the ultimate demise of my little on-line gallery.  The other thing I learned is that the marketing I learned in college changed super-fast with the introduction of social media and SEO.  I was in over my head and didn’t have a clue as to how to get the world to pay attention to b-native.  I gave it up after 5-years. 

Marigny Goodyear West Coast Abstract ArtistThis is what this artist looks like after spending a few hours learning about marketing and PR.  Ouch...it hurts.

Then my childhood best friend moved back home to New Orleans and hired me to work with her as an…

Education Programs Coordinator - “Party planning with lots of presentations and no booze.”

Here my hospitality education was applied in a different way but those lessons about attention to detail, follow up, customer service…it’s all really the same thing.  I also learned that I’m a terrible proof reader.  Again, this only lasted about a year because we upped and moved to Oregon where I became…

…Executive Assistant - “I do it ALL”

I did…I did it all.  I loved my bosses and the people I worked with.  I stayed with them over 8 years which was a record for me, by far.  I learned how to change hats quickly and as needed (even if it’s not on my schedule) and how to juggle the demands of two different people who have two different sets of needs. When I began working for them, they didn’t even own a filing cabinet.  I built their organization and scheduling systems, helped with fund raising, planned events, I even got to travel a bit.  Here I became an organizational master.  I kept myself, and them, on task and knowing what’s coming up next, without question.  I was really good at it and I enjoyed it until it just wasn’t challenging anymore.

While I was with them, I started doing art on the side and 4 years later, I left to pursue art as my career.  When I started painting and experiencing the joy and remembering how important art is in my life, I got a bit sad.  I thought “Wow, I’ve really wasted a lot of time.”  But now, that I’m actually pursuing art as a business, I realize that all of these different roles that I’ve taken on over time have allowed me to come full circle back to art. 

In this world of endless information choices, it is hard to see that we are on a path.  For me, all of the day jobs were a road to abstract art. 

We live in a time when the 40-year career at one company and retiring with a pension is pretty much dead.  Being bombarded by so much information and options, it is really hard to focus on what we are “meant” to do.  I believe that all of us have that thing that we are blessed with and meant to share with the world. 

The challenge is to see beyond the pay check, the obligations, the Joneses… What is our gift to give and how can all the different experiences in life allow us to grow that gift into a career? I am an artist.  I am also a business woman with an organizational mind.  Two things I grew up thinking couldn’t possibly work together in one brain.  But here I am. 

So, now that I’m done updating my financial spreadsheet and my marketing tasks for the day, I’m heading into the studio where my structured brain can release into a creative space. I’m realizing that all of my different talents can be applied not just to my art, but to my art business.   They actually complement each other quite well.  All of it wasn’t a waste of time at all.  In fact, it was necessity in order to pursue my passion.

If you experience day-job frustration, I urge you to make a list of all the things that you’ve learned at each jobby-job, and write how they can benefit you and your passion.  It may shift your thinking.  I’d love to see what you write.  Hit reply and let me know, or answer in the comments below and if you know someone who is frustrated by the time their day job takes from their passion, please share this with them.   Onward!

The painting at top is Animator, 36x36 Paper, Acrylic, Graphite & Crayon on Canvas. Please forgive the lack of images in this blog post....apparently I didn't take photos of any place that I work prior to becoming an artist.
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Artist Profile: Nicholas Wilton - Building Communities of Creatives One Workshop at a Time

Being a career west coast abstract artist would not be possible without the help of talented teachers.

When I first started this journey of becoming a professional artist, I was running solely on emotion and old, ignored art supplies.  I didn’t have a goal.  I didn’t know that this would be my career.  I was merely trying to express feelings of remorse, anger and agitation that were alarmingly amplified when I decided to quit drinking.  No longer comforted by simply burying these discomforts under the weight of alcohol, I unearthed them and then needed a tool for dealing with the difficulties that bubbled up.  

I had leftover paint, paper and some brushes and so I started.  I had never done abstract painting before, but sobriety was just about all my brain could handle.  Thinking about realistic details of a still life, or…let’s be honest here…trying to do anything with any specificity at all was really difficult.  I just began to move my brush-holding hand and abstracts are what sprung from my fingertips.  And it saved me.  

Finding art again was an unexpected gift given to me by my willingness to let go of old coping mechanisms and being open to getting to know myself.  Self-awareness had never been my strong suit.  So, discovering that I am an artist was amazing and at the same time, a “well duh” moment.  I knew it all along, I just ignored it because I didn’t think it was practical road to travel.

Guidance from an established west coast abstract artist and teacher was the inspiration I didn't know I needed.

Nicholas Wilton West Coast Abstract Mixed Media Artist
Nicholas Wilton is a Sausalito, CA based abstract artist and teacher whose workshop I attended flipped me into action.  I have been painting consistently since.

 

A year into my self-administered art therapy adventure, a good friend suggested that I take an Art 2 Life workshop taught by Sausalito, CA based abstract artist, Nicholas Wilton.  After briefly checking out his website, I was immediately attracted to Nick’s art.  His use of shape, repeated pattern, movement and vibrant colors widened my eyes and motivated me to learn more.  I signed up and drove to California for 5 days of art making.  It was the best thing that I have ever done for my art, my confidence and my career. 

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life Workshop Westerbeke RanchDay #1 of Nicholas Wilton's Art 2 Life Workshop at Westerbeke Ranch in Sonoma. 

Nick taught his 6 art principles which included color, harmony, value and design.  Many of these had been introduced to me in my long abandoned fine arts schooling but not thought of since, and they were important reminders, but his 6th principle was the most important and influencing….Soul.  Heeding soul was not taught in art world academia and wasn’t that what I was really working on?  Cleansing, listening, being receptive and responding to my soul?  Without knowing it, Nick was reiterating what I had been learning over the past year…to thine own self be true. 

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life WorkshopDay #4: My works in progress at Nick's Art 2 Life Workshop.  The finished version of the one in the right corner is at the top of this blog post.

Nick also believes in the importance of having a community to lean on as well as contribute to.  Over the past couple of years, he has continued to be a huge support and inspiration to me through his art, blogs, video lessons and willingness to make time for students like me.  He recently made himself available for a 15-minute interview so that I may share some of his wisdom with you. 

If you are an artist needing direction, I highly recommend his workshops and if you can’t afford those, just sign up for his blog "The Artlife".  He often sends out videos discussing his work, process and problem solving.  Read on for our conversation about his influences, challenges and maneuvering through the business of art. 

A 15 minute interview with west coast abstract artist, Nicholas Wilton.

MG: You seem to be a master of creating patterns without making the painting have a “wallpaper” feel.  Is that something that you have to work for or does it come naturally? 

NW: People always say to make exciting design, you have to have a variety of sizes and shapes and things, and you can, for sure…but you can also [work within] a pattern.  If the pattern is repeating, that can be somewhat monotonous because when we look at one part of the picture, the same kind of feeling occurs in another part of the picture, so that’s the recipe for sort of boring somebody.

Nicholas Wilton Color-Field-1 Abstract Painting Mixed Media ArtNicholas Wilton, Color Field One, 36x40, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

But if you can offer differences within that context, that can become really interesting.  So, for example, maybe the pattern repeats, but the color is different on different parts of the pattern. Then that becomes noticeable and interesting.  Or maybe the texture is different.  (Pointing to the painting above.) That painting looks like little chips of color [in rows].  That’s not a very particularly exciting pattern because the pattern isn’t really anything…just a bunch of colors…but I’m talking about colors and the conversation about color.  All of the sizes are the same and they are in a line but I’m really paying attention and offering the viewer something that’s different.  There are contrasts that happen to be in the [different] colors.  Patterns can be wallpaper like but when you change things within that, then it becomes exciting.

MG: The first artist you studied with was a stained-glass artist Ludwig Schaffrath.  How did working with glass influence how you paint now?  What was the biggest lesson that you learned from him as a new artist that you carry with you today?

NW: Well I entered into it more as a craft.  I liked making things, so I was learning how to make stained glass.  The thing about stained glass is that [you start with] incredible pieces of glass.  Some are translucent.  Some are transparent. There’s glass from Germany that’s really beautiful. What you learn pretty quickly is that maybe it’s the materials that are so amazing. 

Let’s say you pull out this amazing piece of glass that you love. It’s so beautiful just on its own. Then you cut it up and you make a flower out of it... So, I became interested in the questions of why do I keep taking this amazing material and turning it into pictures that happens to be made out of stained glass, but really weren’t very good?  When you think about a picture of a stained-glass flower, it’s kind of bric-a-brac. It can be kind of cheesy.  So, I started to look around at different artists that were doing work as good as the materials.  

Nicholas Wilton Art 2 Life Workshop Work TableAn Art 2 Life Workshop table.  The raw materials are just as important as the finished product

 

Ludwig Schaffrath was making these incredible modern day monastery windows…very contemporary and very much in alignment with the glass. I was seduced by the materials because of the caliber of the finished product.  The materials were so good that it upped my game to get better at designing and using it. What I learned from this gentleman when I was 15, is that the only thing you can really do is something personal and unique.  If you want to copy reality, that’s fine but you have to do it in a way that’s personal. He was the first one to press that idea that I still teach today and try to do in my own work.

MG: I recall you saying in a workshop that you can try to make your art look like another artists’ but it’s never going to.  It’s always going to look like you. 

NW: Yeah.  We can try on different ways of working.  I can copy an artist for a day and try to make my art look like theirs but you won’t stay there very long because it’s not very interesting because they’ve already done it.  But it is important for you to pull out and discover the reason why you were attracted to their work.  You might love Mark Rothko but you don’t want to be Mark Rothko.  You just want to understand the way he’s using color because that’s what you love.  I wouldn’t want to do a Mark Rothko painting because he already did them all.  People learn that eventually and they move on. 

Nicholas Wilton Bone-Yard Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Bone Yard, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery (I LOVE this one.)

MG: What is the most challenging part of being an artist at a professional level?

NW: I think there are three parts: 1. Isolation 2. Not having all of the information to do this…it takes time to have all of the information, how to paint, what to do when you get stuck, all of that technical stuff and then 3. Having the right place to do it.   I couldn’t make these paintings in a small room anymore.  I had to move to a bigger space and it was scary.  I had to pay more, I wasn’t sure I could do it… Having a practice that works…that’s something you have to learn.  They don’t teach that.  Having a good community and a solid art practice or approach and just the basic information.  That is what I teach in my online courses and workshops.  If you can give that to people, that does it…. especially the community part.

Nicholas Wilton Millwork Abstract Painting Mixed Media ArtNicholas Wilton, Millwork, 60x60, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG:  So creating a community of artists that you see regularly and having people that you talk with often…

NW:  Yeah and even connected on a Facebook group or whatever.  I’m really interested in creating community…that’s why I’m talking to you right now. We are staying connected.  We might not have talked for a long time but we’re connected and I just believe that’s a path that allows me or anybody to do this rather unusual activity and pull it off successfully. 

MG: You teach workshops as well as painting.  Do you enjoy one more than the other? Do you feel that teaching and painting complement each other?  How? 

NW: They work in conjunction.  I don’t think I could teach if I wasn’t doing the practice.  I have my own personal practice and then I’m helping people develop theirs.  I do these Sunday blog posts and those are done completely spontaneously.  I’m painting and then I learn something new or I’m getting new perspective and I just share that with people. Certainly, the teaching is derived from the painting. And teaching clarifies my own practice.  The best I ever paint is after 7 days of teaching a workshop.  I go home and I can pretty much guarantee that I’m painting more confidently and probably a little bit differently than I was before I left.  So, it’s a win/win as far as I’m concerned.  It works for me.

Also, you can’t forget that by teaching I’m getting inspired by all of these other people.  When I see your painting and what you’re doing…you’re painting larger now…I get that juice from you.  There’s been an exchange because we’ve worked together a little and I see what you’re doing and it’s bigger and it’s “wow!” and that fires me up and my day is just a little bit better and I use that energy to go do this challenge (pointing around the studio). 

Nicholas Wilton Pin-Point Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Pin Point, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG: You had a gift line business adventure at one time.  How did you feel when that opportunity came along and why did you ultimately decide that it wasn’t for you? 

NW: I created the opportunity in a way because I was tired of doing illustrations…you get paid for one and then do another one and another one and another one… I would make some really good art but it would just disappear so I thought “how can I make some of this art stay around?” and the idea of putting it on products, gifts specifically, like trays, boxes and tote bags, came along and I worked with some friends and we created a company. 

What happened though was that the momentum, the need, the desire to sell, that directed the company, of course…that’s the whole point…to make money.  But my direction was partly that, but to also make the best possible work I could.  And at one point, one of our biggest sellers were basically little tiny cheap reproductions of paintings that you could get at Walmart or Bed Bath and Beyond for like $5. I saw my own personal work [reproduced] but I was uncomfortable because I’m also a fine artist and I had done a lot of work to keep my work at a premium, to keep the prices high, to make it prestigious, because it is. It’s what I do.  It’s really important.  But I saw that this was cannibalizing that and I didn’t like that.  It didn’t feel good to me.  And when something doesn’t feel good to me, regardless of the money, I know from art, from my life, you don’t do continue doing that.  You do something else. There are alternatives.

Nicholas Wilton Blue-Storm Abstract Art Mixed Media PaintingNicholas Wilton, Blue Storm, 12x12, Mixed Media on Panel, Caldwell Snyder Gallery

MG: Spring is almost here.  Seeing as nature is such a big influence for you, do you notice that your paintings and pallet choices change when the seasons change? 

NW: Yeah.  I think so. My studio isn’t heated and I’m warmer now, which is half the problem.  I get so damn cold in here because these ceilings are so high so I’m bundled up in the Winter and it’s just a hard road for a few months.  Also, I think Spring is more of an opening and unfolding and Winter is a closing more.  There is an ease to it and a looseness and more color.  I think there tends to be, over the course of an artist’s career, to go from control to more and more loose and more and more exploration and an opening or broadening and I think that relates to seasons as well.

MG: What piece of advice would you give a young artist starting out and does that advice change if someone is starting out as a young artist vs. an older artist? 

NW: I just think it’s important to realize that each person, old, young, whatever, whoever, if they’re interested in doing this and if they can pay attention to what they love, and really focus on that and look within themselves, that’s really the path to making personal, authentic, sellable, desirable work that you love.  That’s the path and that’s available and they have everything they need they just may need some guidance.  Everybody’s unique and everybody can therefore make unique and personal work.  They just have to pay attention to themselves.

Learn more about Nicholas Wilton on his website.

The painting at top by me is "Original Bubble" 12x12 Acrylic, Paper and Graphite on Birch Board and was one of the pieces I created while attending Nicholas Wilton's Art 2 Life Workshop in 2014.  

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Want to Make a Living as an Artist? Better Learn to Hustle!

As I dive into a professional career as a West Coast abstract artist, I am caught in the balancing act of finding time to make art and also figuring out how to get my art noticed.  

I have been in my office today thinking about my job in advertising sales.  I sucked at it.  I had to cold call all sorts of different businesses, from architect firms to gift shops, by phone and in person, in attempt to sell ad space for a New Orleans city magazine.  I didn’t like it at all.  My boss would say things like “We don’t take no for an answer!”  In my mind, I’d be thinking “but they said no…wtf am I supposed to do about it?”  I’m not a pushy person and talking about circulation and demographics just sounded like a hustle.  I didn’t like the hustle.  Now that I’m following my passion, all that has changed. 

Self-promotion is a MUST if I want to get my abstract art noticed.

I had been working on my art biz for almost 4 years when I finally decided to become a full-time artist.  I have enough business background and had done enough research to know that self-promotion was going to be necessary and I was NOT excited about it.  My past experience in sales showed me that I didn’t enjoy it and in turn, I wasn’t very good at it.  

I have never been a person who enjoyed the spot light.  Alcohol used to help with that but when I gave that up, I felt as though I was an introvert who had been pretending, my whole life, to be an extrovert.  The last thing I wanted to do is stand in front of you and tell you how awesome I am.  I realize now that the issue was that I didn't think I was worth much, and how can you self-promote if you have no confidence in what you’re selling?

Finding creative ways to market myself as a West Coast abstract artist is half of my day.  The other half, I actually make art.

As I’ve been diving deeper into what it means to be a professional artist, I find that “hustling” is about half of my day.  I have to figure out different ways to promote my art. I don’t mind talking with people about my art.  I don’t mind sending emails and making phone calls, starting dialogs on Instagram and whipping out business cards without being asked.  In my prior sales experience, my cheeks would burn red and I would get embarrassed talking about the magazine.  It all felt so phony.  But now I believe in what I’m selling and I’m finding out that’s half the battle.

I know there are people in sales who are true artists of their trade.  They can sell anything to anyone at any time.  Hats off to them.  For the rest of us, the most important ingredient to getting noticed is to, first and foremost, believe in your product.  If you’re selling yourself, you’d better like yourself ok or you’re going to have a really hard time.

When I joined Instagram, I stumbled across an artist from Miami named Ronald Sanchez who recently had a show called Word Play.  I am attracted to his use of reclaimed objects and stencil work.  I love his strong typography use and mixed media projects, but what I am really attracted to is his message.

 

My Hustle Has A Hustle Ronald Sanchez Art Miami Florida

After I saw Ronald’s above piece, it became my mantra.  I’m not kidding when I say that every person I see, I’m wondering if they could be a potential collector or influencer.  If I meet you for the first time I’m sizing you up and I can’t wait to tell you I’m an artist.  When I see that spark of interest flash in your eye you can bet that what I’m thinking is, “how can I engage you further?”  My hustle really does have a hustle.  And when I’m feeling so confident about myself that I feel I can do no wrong, I look to another one of Ronald’s pieces that speaks out to me:

 

Humble Hustle Ronald Sanchez Art Miami Florida

 

I can’t forget that staying humble is sometimes as endearing as oozing confidence and the two working together, well it seems a balance that I’ll strive for the rest of my career.  So, thanks to Ronald, for giving me my work mantra.  Because even on days like today, when my hustle feels pretty small, I just have to remember that that the squeaky wheel gets the grease and that I’m not going to reach anyone without making a little noise.  

And with that, look out because I’m off to hustle you, your Grandma and anyone else that might buy my art.  (Note the link?  That's right...I'm hustling you right now!)

The piece at top is Submerged 36x36 Paper & Acrylic on Canvas and it is for sale in my gallery.  Buy it before someone else does...

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